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Post by wonder4u on Sat Aug 16, 2008 10:56 pm

i was wondering why persons who ciaim they are saved, by just accepting Christ into their hearts, say they remember the place, day, moment, and seem to have an unforgetable experience, and catholics never have this. why are they so positive about this. i accept Christ as they do, and never experience this. thank you for any input.

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Post by Amber on Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:20 am

Well, Catholics are considered "saved" at their baptisms and continue to "work out their salvation" as Paul stated in Scripture... Non-Catholic Christians believe they are saved at the moment they "ask Jesus into their hearts as their personal Savior" and that, once that is done, they cannot lose their salvation. THAT is their singular "moment of salvation". It is a one-time event.

However, one must keep in mind that every day requires a conversion of our hearts to God. Some days may have unforgettable experiences, where we truly feel the depth of God's love for us... some days we may not... For Catholics, salvation is a process... There are passages in Scripture which indicate we "have been saved", "are being saved" and "will be saved" (if we continue in his kindness). Since every day is a journey toward salvation, we don't place a date and time on it... but, that doesn't leave us out of the unforgettable experiences we can have when we continue to grow in our faith while the Holy Spirit gives us His abounding grace!
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Post by wonder4u on Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:52 pm

thank you, amber, that was a most inspired answer. i wish i could explain it as well when this subject come up with my companion, as it did the other day. he said, while he listened to a tv minister preach, that what was being said was first we are saved, then we do the works. i disagreed, but only thought of responding with " some are on different paths to the same goal" not much of a comment i guess wonder4u

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Post by Amber on Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:00 am

Well, your partner is partly correct. It is by the grace of God, and that grace alone, that we are saved initially. Once we are justified by God's grace, we must continue in faith AND good works: baptism, loving others, receiving the Eucharist, keeping the commandments. James 2 explains this in an easy to understand way. Faith without works is dead and you cannot have one without the other and be saved.

Many non-Catholic Christians believe the Catholicism teaches that we work our way to heaven by our deeds, by our own merit... that we somehow remove faith from the equation. Not true!

James 2 tells us that if we have faith but do not have works, our faith will not save us. This, of course, is completely opposite of the Protestant doctrine of sola fide (faith alone). They will try to argue that works have nothing to do with salvation and that they are ONLY a response to our faith. But this entire concept is un-biblical and careful study of the Scriptures doesn't not leave this concept open to us as a possibility.

If you'd like a list of verses that dispute "faith alone", let me know. I'd be happy to provide some.
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